gfxgfx
 
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
logo
 
gfx gfx
gfxgfx
 






 
gfx gfx
gfx
179018 Posts in 2133 Topics by 108 Members - Latest Member: CTLovesClay March 20, 2019, 07:04:38 AM
*
gfx* Home Help Login Register gfx
gfx
ClayManiacs.com  |  Archive  |  Solo Tour 2004  |  SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
gfx
gfxgfx
 

Author Topic: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE  (Read 12544 times)

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #75 on: June 27, 2010, 02:09:04 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
 MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #75 on: September 05, 2004, 04:59:45 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOKIA LIVE GRAND PRAIRIE TX PREVIEWS



Quote
Mr. Heartthrob himself seems puzzled by the adulation

Tuesday, September 7, 2004
By DARLA ATLAS / The Dallas Morning News

Sinatra. Elvis.

Clay.

To the rabid fans of American Idol runner-up Clay Aiken, that progression is not a stretch. And his magnetism seems to be growing. The North Carolina redhead, who will be in North Texas for a show Sep. 8, was named sexiest male singer this month in an In Style magazine readers' poll, beating out more conventional hotties Usher and Justin Timberlake. That doesn't surprise Annette Knecht, a 48-year-old Arlington resident and executive director of Texas Clay Fans.

"It's like there's a glow about him that draws us," says Ms. Knecht, who spends about six hours a day working on her fan Web site and other projects on Mr. Aiken's behalf. Since early 2003, when she and the other Claymates first saw him on Idol, "we knew he was the next Frank Sinatra, the next Elvis Presley, that he could change everything."

Mention this to Mr. Heartthrob himself and he laughs. Uproariously.

"Lord, no!" Mr. Aiken says in recent phone interview to promote his concert tour, which comes to the Nokia Theatre at Grand Prairie tonight. "Let's be real: Elvis and Clay Aiken? No."

Pressed to come up with comparisons – what about his onstage charisma? – he says, "We're both Southerners. We have that in common." He thinks some more, then laughs and says, "I'm done."

But that humility is part of his appeal, of course. Mr. Aiken, 25, refuses to cop an egotistical attitude, preferring to stay the same guy he's always been.

As for his ever-shrieking fans, "I really don't get it," he says. "The more people scream for me, the more I think it's a joke."

It's no joke. Ms. Knecht, a married grandmother who works part time for AT&T Wireless, says she and her cohorts "are dedicated to 'Clayverting' people every day. As long as we're devoted and dedicated to what we're doing, he'll continue to make it big."

Why is this important to her? For one, she says Mr. Aiken's music brings her joy. She also appreciates that he's squeaky clean.

"Instead of listening to a song where every word is a curse word, there's a light at the end of the tunnel," she says. "Clay is our light."

While Mr. Aiken appreciates the support, the adoration can be a little overwhelming. Although one of his friends from back home is on the road with him, Mr. Aiken says they have trouble finding things to do in his free time.

"If we go to the mall, it's a big deal; if we go to the movies, it's this big production," he says. "Unless I'm in a fat suit and completely disguised, I'll get recognized."

If fans do spot him, he has but one request: Don't call him Clayton.

That's the name he went by before his fame, he says: "I kind of save it for my mom and the friends who were there before this whole thing happened."

Speaking of those friends, he says he has a rule for them, too: Don't get all weird.

"The only ones I hang out with are the ones who won't treat me any differently," he says. "Actually, my best friends don't even ask me about it anymore. They'll just call and say, 'Hey, I'm having a computer problem – can you help?'"

There's something even Elvis couldn't do.

DALLAS NEWS (registration required)


NOKIA LIVE GRAND PRAIRIE TX REVIEWS




Quote
Fans true to Aiken at Idol turned pop star's Nokia show

By DARLA ATLAS / Special Contributor to The Dallas Morning News

Clay Aiken fans, in a way, are a lot like Grateful Dead fans.

While they don't partake of mind-altering substances or practice free love, they do follow their leader across the country and back, some reportedly seeing their idol 70 times in the past year. That was evident at Mr. Aiken's concert Wednesday night at Nokia Theatre, where devotees - many of child-bearing-or-beyond years - filled the arena almost to capacity....

The ex-dweeb commanded the stage with confidence in his two-part set, which was a bit flashier than his appearance here last spring when he co-headlined with Kelly Clarkson. Opening with "Where the Streets Have No Name," he then peppered his act with lots of laid-back, personal chatter with the crowd....unscripted chattiness was a big part of the show. At one point, Mr. Aiken even showed home movies of himself and the crew screaming during a catapult ride at Six Flags Over Texas.

But there was also singing to be done. Mr. Aiken's booming, buttery voice was in fine form during his show, which included "Measure of a Man," "Kyrie," "Perfect Day" and "I Survived You," the latter of which he poured his heart into. Afterward, the crowd roared its support.

His onstage appeal went beyond the voice -- his talent alone is not what has these women racking up their frequent-flier miles. It's the voice, the sense of humor, the I'm-a-good-guy charitable soul and the cutie-pie face, topped with his secret weapon: the heavily lidded gaze. Mix it all together, and it can get the butterflies stirring.

And for his most devoted fans, the effect is as powerful the first time as it is the 70th.

DALLAS NEWS (registration required)


Quote
Feat of Clay: Aiken's Nokia performance has audience singing along

By Stefan Stevenson
Star-Telegram Staff Writer

Early in his performance at Nokia Live on Wednesday night, Clay Aiken showed why the crowd of 3,500 in attendance and millions around the world have taken to the American Idol alum so strongly.

He's at ease onstage, with banter that seems genuine and heartfelt. He offers no put-upon pop star poses. Oh, and he can sing.

The crowd was made up of mostly females of all ages. There were some men, too, including some devoted husbands and cool dads sprinkled throughout.

By the uplifting finale Solitaire, they were all singing along, or at least tapping their toes.

Aiken appeared from beneath the middle of the stage as a riser lifted and floodlights backlit his entrance for his show-opening version of U2's Where the Streets Have No Name. Wearing a blue button-down dress shirt (untucked, of course), a loosely tied orange tie and gray slacks, Aiken strolled the stage, reading poster-board signs that fans held up while he belted out songs from his album Measure of a Man, such as Shine, When You Say You Love Me and I Will Carry You.

Aiken set the tone early when he challenged the audience to be louder and better dancers than his previous audience in Houston.

Halfway through When You Say You Love Me a young woman appeared onstage dancing enthusiastically. She was celebrating her 18th birthday and trying to prove Dallas-Fort Worth had the better dancers. Meanwhile, Aiken and his three backup singers and five-man band could hardly finish the song they were laughing so hysterically. The crowd loved it. And the birthday girl got a big hug from Aiken, a big ovation and a Clay Aiken thong.

Aiken's performance was undeniably charming, even if '80s-style power ballads are not your thing. His stage presence and good-natured ribbing of his bandmates kept the show loose and fun.

Opening singer-songwriter Ben Jelen and his three-piece band provided a more somber, edgier contrast to Aiken's upbeat set with piano and acoustic-guitar-driven songs. His take on Tracy Chapman's Talkin' 'Bout a Revolution fit in well with his own material, such as Come On from his debut album Give It All Away.


DALLAS FT WORTH TELEGRAM
(registration required)
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #76 on: June 27, 2010, 02:13:50 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #76 on: September 05, 2004, 05:00:53 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KANSAS STATE FAIR HUTCHISON KS PREVIEWS


Quote
Clay Aiken: Electric interview

A lightning-fast talker and a self-proclaimed big nerd, Clay Aiken is bringing his solo act to the Kansas State Fair

By Jan Biles
The Capital-Journal

Multiplatinum recording artist Clay Aiken talks at the speed of lightning.

In 10 minutes -- and speaking with a Southern drawl that surely helped him win InStyle magazine's "Sexiest Singer" title -- the 25-year-old pop star will give you the scoop on his 50-stop solo tour; his inspirational memoir, "Learning to Sing: Hearing the Music in Your Life," out this fall; his untitled Christmas CD, also out this fall; and the Bubel Aiken Foundation, which he founded a year ago to provide opportunities to bring together typical children with children who have developmental disabilities.

A self-professed nerd from North Carolina, he'll tell you about one of the things he does that drives his tour mates crazy. And he'll dispel rumors: No, he hasn't done any screen tests for the movie version of "Rent."

Aiken, who has moved beyond his "American Idol" roots and seems unaffected by his celebrity, also has a reputation for having a wicked sense of humor. Aiken will appear Sept. 10 at Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson.

Here are excerpts of an interview done before his Aug. 19 concert in Buffalo, N.Y.

How would you size up (the tour) so far? What's been the biggest challenge for you?

I think there's a lot of pressure that goes with being on your own. I had a whole bunch of other people with me on the "(American) Idol" tour obviously. Then with Kelly (Clarkson), it was just she and I, so if something went wrong, I could always blame it on her. (Laughs.) Being on your own, all the pressure's on you, right? So if I mess up, it's all my fault.

You do the same material most every night. How do you keep the performances fresh for you, and the backup singers and the band?

Well, usually I make fun of them onstage. (Laughs.) ... We change the songs up a little bit, too. We've been on the road for a little over a month. ... We just added a new song this week ("Chain of Fools"). It, you know, keeps it fresh and new when it's something kind of different.
 
Let me ask you about the book that's coming out this fall, "Learning to Sing."

Well, I kind of had the opportunity to start to work on it about a year ago. ... I kind of put it off. I didn't want to do a book about a biography or a behind-the-scenes process of "Idol." And so I wanted to make sure we had a real thing to write about, something that was worthwhile. Allison (Glock, with Elle magazine,) came out a few times when we were on tour, and she kind of helped me piece it together.

What do you hope people learn from it?
 
You know, I think a lot of people have similar experiences in their life. ... There are people who are stepchildren. There are people who were picked on when they were in school. I was one of those. It's just an opportunity for me to kind of share those experiences and what I've learned. I had a mother and a lot of other friends and family who were big on making sure I took the positive lesson from everything.
 
The Christmas CD's coming out. Describe that, and does this mean we'll see you on a lot of holiday specials this season?
 
It's a very classic Christmas album. We didn't want to do anything that would be dated in a few years. I'm sure I'll be on some specials ... at least on "Good Morning America" and that type of stuff.
 
Let's talk about the foundation. A year now in existence. What would you like to see happen in the second year?
 
You know, it's really exciting to see (our) camp programs (for typical kids and kids with disabilities) that are being successful in Kansas City, and in Charlotte and in Raleigh (N.C.). ... We've had success with Youth Service America, giving out grants to individuals with disabilities who are giving their time and their effort to help to do community service projects in their communities. That's been exciting to watch. There's just been so much more success in one year than I ever thought there would be. Of course, I'd love to see that continue to grow.
 
You've said you're, you know, a big nerd. So what's the nerdiest thing you've done lately?
 
Oh, lord. The nerdiest thing I do traditionally is ... when we get to a city, I usually grab the magazine in the hotel room. You know, there's a visitor magazine that tells a bunch of stuff about the town? ... I always do the research on the town. I want to know when it was founded and how it got its name. I want to know all that sort of stuff (laughs), and then when we get on the bus, I tell everybody. (Laughs.)
TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL


Quote
Aiken goes one-on-one

By Jan Biles
The Capital-Journal

Here is a transcript of the interview done with singer Clay Aiken before his concert Aug. 19 in Buffalo, N.Y.:

Aiken: Hello?
C-J: Hey, Clay, how ya doing?

Aiken: Is this Jan?
C-J: It is.

Aiken: How are ya?
C-J: I'm OK. How are you?
Aiken: Pretty good.

C-J: Where are you calling from today?
Aiken: Ohhhh, Buffalo, N.Y.

C-J: Buffalo, OK. Well, I want to ask you about the tour, and the book, and the new CD, and all of this sort of stuff.
Aiken: OK.

C-J: Now, the tour's about halfway through, right?
Aiken: Right, I think we're right at the halfway mark.

C-J: How would you size it up so far? What's been the biggest challenge for you?
Aiken: I think there's a lot of pressure that goes with being on your own, to some extent. ... On the two other tours -- I had a whole bunch of other people with me on the "Idol" tour obviously. Then with Kelly, it was just she and I, so if something went wrong, I could always blame it on her. (Laughs.) Being on your own, all the pressure's on you, right? So if I mess up, it's all my fault. There's a lot of pressure to make sure everything's (going right).

C-J: Now, the Topeka concert was canceled and, of course, we were all upset over that. But your ticket sales have been going pretty well, haven't they?
Aiken: To the most part, yeah. We've had a lot of success. We're doing the show in Hutchinson at the state fair.
C-J: Right.
Aiken: So I think that had a little to do with why sales in Topeka we're not so hot. We actually had initially scheduled two shows in North Dakota, two shows in Kansas, and some of the more rural, smaller states have trouble selling two shows.

C-J: So I was wondering, you do the same material most every night --
Aiken: That's right.

C-J: So how do you keep the performances fresh for you, and the backup singers and the band?
Aiken: Well, usually I make fun on them onstage. (Laughs.) Just last night, we were driving to Toronto to see a friend of mine from "Idol" -- she was Vanessa Olivarez, from the top 12 of my season of "Idol." She's the lead in "Hairspray" in Toronto. So I thought I'd drop by and see her up there.

And Quiana (Parlor), one of the singers from the show with me, we were driving up to the Canadian border, and she said: "Oh, I don't have my passport. They're not going to let me through. They're not going to let me through." And I said, "Well, you don't need a passport to get into Canada, you just have to have your ID." And so she was like, "Yeah, you do." And I said, "You'll see. You don't worry about it, you'll be fine." And she said, "What about when we go to New Mexico this summer, are we going we have to use a passport?" I said, "You've got to be kidding me. We don't need a passport there." (Laughs) So I make fun on them onstage.

We change the songs up a little bit, too. We've been on the road for a little over a month, about a month and half now. I kind of try to -- we just added a new song this week ("Chain of Fools") that Quiana and I sing on the show. ... So the show changes every night to the most part. We rarely do the same show every night simply because it, you know, keeps it fresh and new when it's something kind of different.

C-J: Well, let me ask you about the book that's coming out this fall, "Learning to Sing." You've been working with Allison Glock with that, is that right?
Aiken: Right.

C-J: Tell me about the process of writing this book. When in the heck did you find time to do it in the first place?
Aiken: Well, I kind of had the opportunity to start to work on it about a year ago. ... I kind of put it off. I didn't want to do a book about a biography or a behind-the-scenes process of "Idol." And so I wanted to make sure we had a real thing to write about, something that was worthwhile. So we started the whole process -- started working on it in April. And, yeah, there's not too much free time involved.

So I'd think about working on some stuff, and then Allison would come out. Allison came out a few times when we were on tour, and she kind of helped me piece it together. A lot of the stuff that I had was in the wrong places and didn't flow so well, kind of a bunch of crazy thoughts here and there, kind of mushed together and it didn't flow at all. So she would come out, she came out a few times, and, you know, (her) expertise in writing kind of helped me get it all in order.

C-J: OK, so she helped with organizing and ...
Aiken: Well, she helped with writing, as well.

C-J: What do you hope people take from the book, you know, after they've read it? What do you hope they learn from it?

Aiken: I kind of feel like it's an opportunity for me to share some experiences. You know, I think a lot of people have similar experiences in their life. ... There are people who are stepchildren. There are people who were picked on when they were in school. I was one of those. It's just an opportunity for me to kind of share those experiences and what I've learned.

I had a mother and a lot of other friends and family who were big on making sure I took the positive lesson from everything, whether it was good or bad.

It's just a chance for me to talk about that, and if people come away from it saying, "You know what? That's the same thing I went through, and I can learn the same thing and that's a good way to look at things," then great. If they can read it and think it's funny and entertaining and like to find out a little more information about me, that's fine with me.

C-J: OK. Is this something you think you'd like to do more of in the future -- writing books?
Aiken: Writing?

C-J: Yeah.
Aiken: It's not so easy (laughs), not at all, so I don't know whether it's something in the near future, you know. Maybe in 30 years, if I do have a biography, we'll put it together, but right now I don't think so.

C-J: The Christmas CD's coming out. Describe that a little bit, and does this mean we'll see you on a lot of holiday specials this season?
Aiken: The Christmas CD, we have to finish. We have to do a few more songs on it at the end of the month. We just have to finish wrapping it up and put a lid on it. It's a very classic Christmas album. We didn't want to do anything that would be dated in a few years, like with a lot of original stuff, lots of original production. It's very classic, with orchestral arrangements ... compare it to an Andy Williams' type album that can be sold year after year, you know, and people can put it on and it feels like Christmas and feels like the holiday.

And so, that's what we've done. ... I'm sure I'll be on some specials every once in awhile, at least on "Good Morning America" and that type of stuff. Other than that, I'm not really sure what's in the works. All that stuff kind of comes with when the album comes out and you see what's available.

C-J: OK. I also wanted to ask about your relationship with Disney. I know they're sponsoring the tour and you've got the "Aladdin" DVD coming out. Do you have other projects in the works with Disney?
Aiken: Right now, the biggest project we have with them is their sponsorship of, their work with the foundation. They're partnering with the foundation on some of our initiatives and helping us get the word out, helping us do quite a bit of marketing with the media, strategizing I guess, to make sure we get the information out about the Bubel Aiken Foundation and some of our stuff.

They partnered with the tour -- with the foundation first actually, sorry, and then with the tour second after I sang the song on the "Aladdin" CD, or DVD, sorry. So right now, that's all that we have in the works. You know, if there's something I'd love to do at one point and if they're ever interested in wanting to see me voice some character from a movie, maybe I'd do it.

C-J: Well, speaking of movies, you know, there's some rumors out there that you've done some screentests for "Rent" and ...
Aiken: There's a lot of rumors.

C-J: Yeah.
Aiken: You are the biggest person I've spoken to in months on rumors. (Laughs.) ... I mean, I've heard the rumor, but there's no truth to it.

C-J: There's no truth to the fact that you are involved in any movies?
Aiken: Not right now.

C-J: OK, all right.
Aiken: Now, maybe in the future, I'd love to do it. Right now, I've been on tour. I've been on the road.

C-J: OK, well, let's talk about the foundation. A year now in existence, and it's done wonderfully. What would you like to see happen in the second year?
Aiken: You know ... it's really exciting to see (our) camp programs that are being successful in Kansas City, and in Charlotte and in Raleigh. And next year, we're signed up (to be in) other cities. Miami is one of them, one of the places where we could work with the foundation's summer camp program. We've had success with Youth Service America, giving out grants to individuals with disabilities who are giving their time and their effort to help to do community service projects in their communities. That's been exciting to watch.

There's just been so much more success in one year than I ever thought there would be. Of course, I'd love to see that continue to grow. I'd love to see that continue and then flourish and be successful, for obvious reasons.

I think it would be wonderful -- you know, I don't know how long I'll be doing this singing thing. I'm enjoying it and would love to do it as long as people let me, but I'm not so sure that I'll be doing it for 30 years. The foundation, what I'd love to see happening, is for it to kind of spread its own wings and take on a life of its own. And, therefore, in 30 years if I'm not, (or) in two years if I'm not doing this, that it will be able to be successful.

Aiken's personal assistant interrupts, saying there's time for one more question.

C-J: OK. Well, this is a silly question, all right?
Aiken: OK.

C-J: You've said that you're ...
Aiken: You're wasting your last question on a silly question?

C-J: This is a silly question, yes.
Aiken: (Laughs.)

C-J: I won't ask about InStyle, OK?
Aiken: (Laughs.)

C-J: Here's the silly question. You've said you're, you know, a big nerd, so what's the nerdiest thing you've done lately?
Aiken: Oh, lord. The nerdiest thing done lately, what is the nerdiest thing I've done. The nerdiest thing I do traditionally is -- everyone always makes fun of me about stuff -- when we get to a city, I usually grab the magazine in the hotel room. You know, there's a visitor magazine that tells a bunch of stuff about the town?

C-J: Right.
Aiken: I always do the research on the town. I want to know when it was founded and how it got its name. I want to know all that sort of stuff (laughs), and then when we get on the bus I tell everybody. And they get tired of that. (Laughs) So we know Buffalo ...

C-J: Thank you so much, Clay.
Aiken: You're quite welcome, and thank you.
TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL



ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #77 on: June 27, 2010, 02:19:40 PM »
Quote
Clay Aken headlines grandstand acts at the Kansas State Fair
By Joyce Hall

Clay Aiken is having a spectacular year. His debut album, "Measure of a Man," has reached double platinum status.

Aiken, who is in his first ever headlining tour this summer, is humbled by all the attention.
"It's been pretty hectic," he said. "It's hard to believe it's only been a year."
Aiken, 25, will be the first performer at the 2004 Kansas State Fair at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 10.

(snip)

It's been an amazing journey for the man born Nov. 30, 1978, in Raleigh, N.C. Aiken's musical talent was evident when he was just 3 years old. His mother, Faye, worked at the local Sears. Aiken was paid a dollar to stand up on the carpet samples and sing a song.
He grew up with an older brother, a younger brother and a younger sister, listening to the oldies and country radio stations that his mother liked. At age 7, he pasted a penny to a coupon and sent it away for 12 albums from a record club. His mother let him keep the Crystal Gayle LP, which he played on the Fisher-Price record player in his room, along with the first single he bought, "Meet Me in Montana" by Marie Osmond and Dan Seals.
His love for music and singing led him to join the Raleigh Boys Choir. By seventh grade he had joined his school choir. When that wasn't enough, he won roles in high school musicals, along with a dinner theater stint one summer.

(snip)

His meteoric rise to stardom continues at a hot pace. He is recording a holiday-themed CD, to be released for Christmas 2004.
With an easygoing charm, this honey-sweetened tenor has been obviously popular. He's still adjusting to a pretty hectic lifestyle and life on the road in a tour bus. Home for Aiken is Los Angeles, where he lives with his dog, Raleigh, a border terrier.

"I have tried to stay the same person," he said. "But now I'm more aware of my surroundings. It's different having to worry about being out in the public."

For now, Aiken will continue performing his songs that he said appeal to all ages - as long as his fans are happy.

"This is where God put me," he said.
No link. Transcribed at The Clackhouse.


KANSAS STATE FAIR HUTCHISON KS REVIEWS


Quote
The "American Idol" runner-up ranks first with the thousands who make a pilgrimage to the State Fair to exalt him.

BY DENISE NEIL
The Wichita Eagle

HUTCHINSON - Don't tell Chris Self that Clay Aiken didn't win "American Idol."

Paying for $50 worth of T-shirts and programs at Aiken's Kansas State Fair concert on Friday, Self, a 34-year-old teacher from Lawrence, was still steaming.

The voting on the televised talent show is flawed, she said. Fans can't get through on the phone lines to vote for their favorite singers. She's even started an online petition in hopes of getting the system changed.

But on Friday night, Self was on a different crusade.

"My life's goal is to get my picture taken with Clay," said Self, admitting her chances didn't look too good.

Self was one of 4,595 Clay Aiken fanatics who crowded into the State Fair's grandstand for the singer's opening-night concert. The show could be heard across the fairgrounds, from the swine barn to the midway.

Aiken rose to pop stardom after finishing second on the second season of the popular Fox show "American Idol." A little bit geeky but a little bit cool, Aiken's every-guy appeal has since earned him more fans and more financial success than the show's winner, Ruben Studdard.

Studdard performed at the Wichita River Festival in May.

On Friday, Aiken's fans -- the majority of them families and women ages 30 to 60 -- screamed with delight at the site of the spiky-topped redhead.

He emerged ontothe stage from behind a set of stairs that rose up like a garage door. Aiken immediately set the tone for his cover-heavy show by opening with the U2 hit, "Where the Streets Have No Name."

The rest of Aiken's performance was as engaging as his voice was strong and clear. In between songs, the personable star chatted up the audience.

At one point, he invited an audience member -- Annie from Salina -- onstage to see whether she could out-dance the crowd members he'd just seen at Iowa's state fair.

"Your dancer beat Iowa's dancer," he said afterward. "You're on your way to Midwest domination."

Aiken also invited a pre-auditioned audience member on stage to sing a duet with him. The winner was a 62-year-old woman from Midwest City, Okla., who sang in perfect pitch with Aiken, much to the crowd's delight.

He also regaled the audience with tales of his Thursday night outing to P.F. Chang's restaurant in Wichita and showed footage of himself shot last week when he visited Six Flags Over Texas.

In between goofing around, he found time to perform a few songs from his album, "Measure of A Man," including "I Will Carry You," "When You Say You Love Me" and "Perfect Day."

Wichitan Jackie Palmer, an Aiken enthusiast who says she has taped every appearance he has made on television, said she was second in line the day tickets went on sale.

Aiken is so popular, she said, because he appeals to so many different ages.

"I like that he's clean cut," she said. "He's a nice guy, a role model."


KANSAS.COM
 
 
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #78 on: June 27, 2010, 02:22:05 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #78 on: September 05, 2004, 05:02:53 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


ALLEGAN COUNTY FAIR ALLEGAN MI REVIEWS


Quote
Aiken fans cheer on their guy
Tuesday, September 14, 2004
By Lorilee Craker
The Grand Rapids Press

What can account for the massive appeal of the unassuming, moderately handsome Clay Aiken?

I'm told fan-club Claymates call it the "it" factor: When it comes to why you should be an adoring fan or not -- either you get "it" or you don't.

After an hour and a half of deafening shrieks and mostly feminine jubilation, it was clear the Monday night crowd -- some 3,200 strong -- at the Allegan County Fair got "it" in a big way.

When a stage platform area split open and Aiken walked out, well, God help anyone who got between the ladies and their beloved crooner. (And by the way, the ratio of men to women was about one guy to every six gals. Those are Michael Bolton-concert numbers, people!)

At 25, Aiken didn't come of age in the '80s, but that era is the source of many songs in his set list. The soaring chorus on "Kyrie," by Mr. Mister, spotlighted his lofty voice well, while tunes such as Toto's "Rosanna" and Orleans' "Still the One" were delivered with sass and relish.

Certainly, the Claymates -- and probably everyone else -- were on hand to hear Clay sing songs from his album "Measure of a Man," which, of course, he did to the delight of his enraptured fanatics.

"I Will Carry You," Aiken's new single, featured the kind of swelling chorus and emotional climax that works so well with his pipes and persona.

The CD's title song, meanwhile, was one of those overblown anthems "American Idol" stars are so fond of puffing up to deliver. Aiken was most engaging during shiny pop songs with glossy, hook-laden melodies, such as "I Survived You" -- probably a future radio hit -- and the show's closing smash, "Invisible."

Toward the end of the concert, Aiken and his outstanding backup singers -- including the incredible Angela Fisher -- changed into all-white outfits and shifted into a major praise mode.

His gospel-tinged "You Were There" was accented by big screens on each side of the stage showing a cross, pages of Scripture and other Christian symbols. This segment of the concert clearly meant much to Aiken, and probably to many of his fans, too.

The backup singers weren't just fantastic in the background, they were dynamite up front, too. They carried much of the marvelous James Taylor montage, singing to the stars on "Sweet Baby James," "You've Got a Friend" and "How Sweet It Is To Be Loved By You."

Aiken's banter and teasing with his band were genuine and added even more warmth to the evening. At one point, one of his singers scared Aiken with a rubber snake, smack dab in the middle of a song. One might assume a concert by an "Idol" veteran would be scripted to a T, but Aiken actually is very good at off-the-cuff jokes and responding to the crowd. His duet with an adorable girl named Hayley, from Okemos, was thoroughly charming.

Though it seemed impossible for the ladies to swoon more than they already had, Aiken had one more chance to make 'em melt: His encore, "Solitaire."

Yes, the screams could be heard in Kent County on that one.

All good things, of course, must come to an end, even for Claymates such as Cheryl Van Andel, a 40-something fan from Grand Rapids.

Van Andel said she had never joined a fan club before the Claymates, but there was something about Aiken that prompted her to sign up. What was it, exactly, about the spiky-haired songster that caused her -- and thousands more across the country -- to throw away the sensibilities of middle age and type away for hours with strangers in chat rooms about this man?

"Where do I start?" Van Andel asked, grinning. "Where do I start?"

MLIVE
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #79 on: June 27, 2010, 02:25:55 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #79 on: September 05, 2004, 05:03:39 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ROBERTS STADIUM EVANSVILLE IN PREVIEWS


Quote
'Claymates' rejoice! His tour stops here

By BILL MEDLEY Courier & Press staff writer 464-7519 or medleyb@courierpress.com
September 9, 2004

He's "Invisible" no more. Millions watched Clay Aiken's life change in an instant when he made the finals of "American Idol" last year.

And while the 25-year-old from Raleigh, N.C., lost the top spot to crooner Ruben Studdard, his connection with fans ensured he wouldn't be sentenced to obscurity.

Aiken is bringing his tour, including the hit "Invisible," to Evansville's Roberts Stadium Tuesday night. He'll likely get a warm reception here from the same legion of "Claymates" who have greeted him at concerts across the country.

It'll be Aiken's third trip to Indiana in what has shaped up to be a busy summer schedule. He's already made stops in Indianapolis and Fort Wayne between shows at state and county fairs throughout the Midwest. B16

"Beyond the singing, Aiken bonded well with an audience that already loved him," the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel's Tim Cuprisin wrote after a performance last month.

After "American Idol" wrapped up its second season, Aiken's album, "Measure of a Man," debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart. He was also featured on the cover of Rolling Stone and was named one of the sexiest people alive by People magazine.

Not bad for someone who came in second. The outcome hasn't been as good for Justin Guarini.

Remember him? He was the runner-up to Kelly Clarkson during "American Idol's" first season. Aiken's album sales and name recognition surpassed Guarini's, even though both used the show to jump straight into America's family rooms.

The difference has been the fans. Aiken has been able to connect with people by promoting his "regular guy" image.

Aiken, who willingly admits in interviews that he considers himself a geek, probably embodies the essence of "American Idol" better than most of the performers.

The idea behind the show is for "normal" people to hone their talents before the three judges, who sometimes offer scathing critiques of the artists.

Idol contestants don't come much more normal than Aiken. While he was working toward a degree in special education in North Carolina, a family friend heard him singing and suggested he try out for the show's second season.

Aiken made the first cut but was voted out during the show's fourth week. Later in the season, though, he returned and qualified for the finals during a special "wild card" show.

After facing down the judges' constant scrutiny and comments about his style (or lack of it), Aiken seemed to hit his stride midway through the season, and struck a note with viewers, who kept him on the show week after week as they voted off other competitors.

With second place in hand and a blockbuster album about to take off, Aiken seemed to realize that his sudden fame could fade away just as soon as it came.

Shortly after the end of "American Idol," Aiken established the Bubel/Aiken Foundation, which provides grants to developmentally disabled people.

"My ultimate goal is for this foundation to really make an impact," Aiken says. Aiken also says he hasn't ruled out a return to the work that consumed his pre-"Idol" life.

"I fell in love with working with individuals with autism, and I planned my life out. I was going to teach for six years, and then I wanted to go to William & Mary to get my master's in administration. I still would love to. I could still see myself as a school principal at the age of 50."

But it's probably a safe bet that his fans don't want him to head back to school anytime soon.

COURIER PRESS (registration required)
 
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #80 on: June 27, 2010, 02:28:42 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #80 on: September 05, 2004, 05:04:22 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YORK FAIR YORK PA REVIEWS


Quote
Screeching for Clay
Fans swooned over the 'Idol' runner-up at the fair.
By MIKE CAGGESO
Daily Record/Sunday News
Friday, September 17, 2004

Let's all be thankful Wednesday wasn't "free wine-glass night" at the York Fair, because the glasses would have broken from the insane amount of female screaming at the grandstand.

Clay Aiken walked on stage to the yelling of about 9,000 fans — most of them women of all ages — who clenched their hearts as Aiken cooed through his set list of ready-to-sell power ballads.

Sandwiched between Kid Rock and Lynyrd Skynyrd on the fair's concert lineup, Aiken's music and image were as wholesome and digestible as a granola bar.

Aiken made thousands of women scream by pointing at them. He broke hearts by rolling up his sleeves. Just by walking the stage at the pace of a slug, Aiken made a large pocket of people jump from their seats as if they were sitting on springs.

That kind of game with the ladies makes talking to them mighty easy.

"Man, I tell ya what York, Pennsylvania. You look good and you sound good," Aiken said in his syrupy Southern voice.

Musically, his nine-piece band didn't offer much more than elevator music. And Aiken's three backup singers lent their pipes for some of the higher and longer notes.

Aiken's show was loaded with cover songs, from U2's "Where the Streets Have No Name," to James Taylor's "Sweet Baby James" to Marvin Gaye's "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)."

Aiken leaped to superstardom months before his first record deal, during the second season of "American Idol." Since the show began three years ago, a lot of similar-looking and similar-sounding singers have jumped from our televisions to CD players. None has made half the impact on their fans as Aiken.

Around the world and all over the Internet, a loyal following of "Claymates" host fan sites and chat rooms. One of those groups, the South Central PA Clay Fans, held a pre-concert party at the Yorktowne Hotel.

Collector's items such as autographed CDs, a Clay Aiken quilt and Clay Aiken pillow cases were auctioned off to the 200-some attendees. Proceeds were donated to the Bubel/Aiken Foundation, which provides services and assistance to integrate children with disabilities into everyday life.

Susan Gerald of Raleigh, N.C. — Aiken's hometown — unloaded $1,451 for a front-row ticket to Wednesday night's concert.

"I'll get to see a great show and I'm supporting a great cause," Gerald said, adding that she has been to several Aiken concerts already.

The party was emceed by a Clay Aiken lookalike from Baltimore, and entertainment was provided by "The Clayford Wives," a group of local women performing a skit on the little things they would do for Aiken if married to the chap.

Parties like this take place across the country before many of Aiken's tour dates.

"I feel when I go to a Clay concert, I'm going to a family reunion," said Leader Heights resident and party organizer Samantha O'Heren.
YORK DAILY RECORD


Quote
Aiken wows his 'Claymates' at York Fair performance

By Jade Kelly Solovey , Special to the Chronicle  09/23/2004
 
Reality television did not make Clay Aiken a singer, but it sure did make him a star. Unlike some of his American Idol finalist counter parts, he has the talent to back it up.

The flawless, sweet sounds of Clay carried through the balmy air when Aiken performed for a near-capacity crowd of 8,755 at the York Fair last Thursday night.
     
Even the singer's mom, Faye Parker, was on-hand for the show. Parker was put to work when, prior to the show, she selected a lucky, talented young lady to sing on stage with Aiken.
     
The evening started with a nod to the singer's sponsors via a video sneak peak at the new song Aiken has lent his voice to. The soon-to-be released Disney's Aladdin Special Edition DVD features a resurrected song from the infamous "vault" titled "Proud of Your Boy."
     
Aiken emerged from beneath a staircase met with the roar of the predominantly middle-aged and female crowd of Claymates. He broke into "Where the Streets Have No Name" by U2, then transitioned into his own bouncy "Perfect Day."
     
The singer greeted his audience with a mix of humor and Southern charm.
"You look good, you sound good, York Pennsylvania," Aiken said. "I gotta be honest with ya ...you got 'em all whooped right here."
     
He then offered the crowd an opportunity to prove it, inviting two fans to dance onstage during "When You Say You Love Me," and to earn a Hawaiian lei now coveted by Claymates everywhere.
     
"You've got some people who can move," Aiken said, "some people who had a little too much sugar at the fair."
     
As the evening progressed, it was evident that Parker's boy has grown during the past several months on the road. Aiken is starting to overcome his reputation for being clumsy, tripping and occasionally dropping the microphone - certainly part of his Southern, boyish charm that keeps the ladies reeling. This powerful performance was even more solid and confident than some previous ones, and it was seriously rocking at times.
     
The evening's highlights included a video montage of Aiken's television appearances, accomplishments and experiences since the end of season two of American Idol. The crowd roared with approval at the sight of the Rolling Stone cover featuring Aiken - particularly a panning shot of the WWJD bracelet that he refused to remove for the photo shoot.
     
His show of faith did not stop there, as Aiken, adorned in choirboy white covered "You Were There," a spiritual ballad recognizing God's omnipresence. He received a resounding "amen" from the crowd upon singing the lyrics "You would rather die than leave us in the dark." It was a very poignant, powerfully-moving point in his performance.
     
Aiken and his band filled the show with covers like "Kyrie" by Mr. Mister, a rocking rendition of Stevie Wonder's "Signed Sealed Delivered," and a mesmerizing version of Toto's "Rosanna" that, in the words of Paula Abdul, Aiken "took and made his own."
     
The evening's performance also included a salute to James Taylor featuring back-up singers Angela Fisher, Quiana Parler and Jacob Litrell on lead for "Sweet Baby James," "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)," "Yesterday Morning," and "You Got a Friend."
     
Aiken and company have taken to vocally challenging each other by seeing who can hold a note the longest. (It was Aiken, by the way.) The singer's talent, confidence and experienced showmanship emerged each time he stepped out of his comfort zone with a howl or a growl integrated into his phenomenal, standard performance.
     
Aiken also wowed 'em with his current single, "I Will Carry You," a particular favorite with the audience; "Measure of a Man"; "I Survived You"; and his first hit, "This Is The Night."
     
"That song means a lot for obvious reasons. It was a pivotal point in my life," he said.
     
"If you had asked me two years ago where I would be tonight, I would not have said York, Pennsylvania. [I'm] glad I'm here. I feel blessed to have the opportunity."
     
The singer dedicated "Invisible" to the crowd and sang the words "I am nothing without you" with particular emphasis as he pointed to his fans. He then disappeared under the stair, only to emerge atop the stage for an encore that featured "Solitaire."
     
Aiken provides a night of outstanding vocals and powerful simplicity - no lasers or five-second delays required.
HERSHEY CHRONICLE
 
 
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #81 on: June 27, 2010, 02:32:30 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #81 on: September 05, 2004, 05:05:10 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
THE BIG E WEST SPRINGFIELD MA REVIEWS


Quote
Clay Aiken wows Big E crowd

Wednesday, September 22, 2004
By DONNIE MOORHOUSE Music writer

WEST SPRINGFIELD - "American Idol 2003" runner-up Clay Aiken headlined the Big E in West Springfield Sunday night, performing a 90-minute set of earnest pop music for a crowd of thousands, many of whom had lined up early in the day for a chance to see the television music star.

Aiken proved to be poised and polished, taking the lessons he learned from the talent competition known as "American Idol," and transferring them into a palatable stage show that ran flawlessly from pillar to post.

It was the final show of Aiken's 2½-month summer tour, and much of the time on stage was spent with band members looking over their shoulders and waiting for the next practical joke to fall. Aiken was victimized by a Vaseline covered microphone, while his guitarist was doused with a bucket of ping pong balls during his big solo.

Whether the practical joke theme was genuine, or part of a choreographed stage show, it was successful in keeping the energy level high on stage.

Only a year into his professional career, Aiken is an absolute marvel in the way he handles a performance. He appears as a seasoned veteran, at ease with the microphone, and capable of handling impromptu moments in front of a crowd of thousands.

Aiken was late coming to the stage, a full hour later than the scheduled 7 p.m. start time, and 30 minutes after opener Ben Jelen completed his set. Fans were understandably anxious, at one point raining boos down from the bleachers at the delay.

All was forgiven when Aiken rose on a hydraulic lift to a multi-tiered stage and offered U2's "Where the Streets Have No Name." Children were immediately thrust upon the shoulders of parents to get a better view.

A dance competition brought "Amanda from Washington" up on stage to two-step with the back-up singers and give Aiken an enthusiastic embrace. The singer followed with another cover, this time working up Mister Mister's "Kyrie."

Aiken also delivered some cuts from his debut "The Measure of a Man," including the title track and the ballad "I Will Carry You."

He gave ample time to his three backing vocalists as well, allowing them to either duet or solo on a medley of James Taylor hits including "Sweet Baby James," "How Sweet It Is," and "Fire and Rain."

Aiken took control of the stage again with a rocking version of "Still The One," and a cover of Toto's "Roseanna." He closed the set with a rendition of "This Is The Night," and encored with a cover of Neil Sedaka's "Solitaire."

Ben Jelen had the unenviable task of opening for Aiken and quelling the anticipation of an army of Aiken supporters. He handled the task with aplomb, winning converts with his semi-rock piano ballads and a cover of Tracy Chapman's "Talkin' 'Bout a Revolution."

MASS LIVE
 
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #82 on: June 27, 2010, 02:35:06 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #82 on: September 05, 2004, 05:05:52 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CAROWINDS PALADIUM CHARLOTTE NC REVIEWS

Quote
Aiken performs at Carowinds
10/17/2004 12:54 PM
By: News 14 Carolina
Aiken will perform at the State Fair in Raleigh on Monday.   

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- American Idol runner-up Clay Aiken returned to Charlotte Saturday and performed before a packed crowd at the Palladium Amphitheatre at Paramount's Carowinds.

Aiken is no stranger to the Queen City, he graduated from UNC Charlotte in 2003.

Though many in attendance were locals, there were plenty from out of town. Fans from as many as 30 states and four countries visited the park. Among the out of towners were members of Penny Lane, a grassroots fundraising project which donates money to the Bubel-Aiken Foundation.

The group of Clay fans host parties in every city where he performs and raised more than $1,600 Saturday, oushing their grand total above the $20,000 mark.

Clay fans will continue to collect change in the Tar Heel State as they are heading to Raleigh next for the singer's performance at the State Fair on Monday.
NEWS 14 CAROLINA
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #83 on: June 27, 2010, 02:38:41 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #82 on: September 05, 2004, 05:05:52 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


CAROWINDS PALADIUM CHARLOTTE NC REVIEWS
Quote
Aiken performs at Carowinds
10/17/2004 12:54 PM
By: News 14 Carolina
Aiken will perform at the State Fair in Raleigh on Monday.   

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- American Idol runner-up Clay Aiken returned to Charlotte Saturday and performed before a packed crowd at the Palladium Amphitheatre at Paramount's Carowinds.

Aiken is no stranger to the Queen City, he graduated from UNC Charlotte in 2003.

Though many in attendance were locals, there were plenty from out of town. Fans from as many as 30 states and four countries visited the park. Among the out of towners were members of Penny Lane, a grassroots fundraising project which donates money to the Bubel-Aiken Foundation.

The group of Clay fans host parties in every city where he performs and raised more than $1,600 Saturday, oushing their grand total above the $20,000 mark.

Clay fans will continue to collect change in the Tar Heel State as they are heading to Raleigh next for the singer's performance at the State Fair on Monday.
NEWS 14 CAROLINA
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #84 on: June 27, 2010, 02:40:37 PM »
Pamela
Assistant Webmaster
MEDIA PREVIEWS & REVIEWS
« Reply #83 on: September 05, 2004, 05:06:45 AM » 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NC STATE FAIR DORTON ARENA RALEIGH NC REVIEWS

Quote
Clay Aiken performs in a familiar arena
By Chick Jacobs
Staff writer

RALEIGH - The Claymates weren't quite ready to let their idol go - not just yet.

So while Clay Aiken wrapped up an exhaustive summer-long tour in his hometown, self-proclaimed members of Generation Clay swarmed the floor of Dorton Arena on Monday for one more up-close look.

The 26-year-old entertainer seemed to revive in their energy, at one point looking back to his singers with a "can you believe this?" look.

The scene wasn't anything new for the platinum-album singer. But standing in the arena, where he used to join his mom watching county concerts and circus acts, it had to feel strange to look out and see an ocean of T-shirts with his face on them.

"I used to come here and watch concerts, mainly because they were free," he told the 6,000-plus jammed into Dorton. "Too bad we can't do that now."

Aiken closed his 2004 tour on familiar footing and a familiar setting - swarms of mostly female fans who have taken an inordinate fancy to the Raleigh native.

Fans such as Robin Cassill drove down from Chillicothe, Ohio, for the chance to catch two Aiken concerts in one day. Francine Daoust made the trip from Montreal.

"He's an inspiration," Cassill said as fellow Generation Claymates nodded in agreement. "It's not just his singing, it's his life."

The group, all clad in their blue T-shirts with a lime-green likeness of Aiken, say his dedication to charities inspired them to send packages to servicemen in Iraq. It also leads them to reflect on their own lives.

"Just this afternoon, I found myself in a situation, and I wondered, 'How would Clay handle this?'" said P.J. Hickle of Pittsburgh. "He provides a role model for people of all ages - spanning the generations."

Certainly, the generations came together to see Aiken at his 3 p.m. show. And they came together quickly - tickets sold out in fewer than 15 minutes. Add the tickets to the evening show and Aiken sold 12,000 tickets in about a half hour.

"How many of y'all are from out of state and got tickets on the Internet?" Aiken asked. The response indicated that at least half the arena had done so.

"Man, there's a lot of ticked-off folks from Raleigh out there looking for you," he said with a grin.

Nobody sat anywhere for long.

When Aiken popped up from a hidden entry on the stage, the noise rivaled Cameron Indoor Stadium during the biggest Duke-UNC game.

Dressed casually in a striped shirt and jeans, Aiken opened with U2's "Where the Streets Have No Name."

Truth be told, he could have sung the Chinese national anthem and folks wouldn't have known it.

"I haven't heard noise like this since The Beatles," said Devon Cain. She had driven down with friends from Alexandria, Va., to celebrate her 60th birthday.

Like dozens of fans, she had a hand-painted sign begging Clay for a kiss, a wave, a wink. Some women were a little more forward, tossing panties on the stage.

But mostly people were there to embrace Clay, emotionally if not physically. His invitation for them to come forward and dance during "Perfect Day" would rival the altar call at a Billy Graham revival. There was something touching about grandparents holding up their grandkids or whirling in the aisles, just like you knew they did in front of the stereo at home. It was comfortable, just like a homecoming should be.

"Some people don't understand," said Daoust of her long trip to see Aiken's homecoming. "It's not just the voice, it's the man. It's what he stands for. It's all that. Fortunately, my husband understands."

FAYETTEVILLE ONLINE


« Last Edit: June 27, 2010, 02:52:27 PM by Marilyn »
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

Marilyn

  • ANN News Team
  • Claymaniac
  • *****
  • Posts: 42046
  • Gender: Female
  • THE EPITOME OF DECORUM
Re: SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
« Reply #85 on: June 27, 2010, 02:52:42 PM »
Quote
Aiken Thrills Fans At State Fair Concerts

POSTED: 7:35 pm EDT October 18, 2004
UPDATED: 3:46 pm EDT October 20, 2004

RALEIGH, N.C. -- The dizzying rides weren't the only attractions at the North Carolina State Fair producing shrieks of delight on Monday.

Singer Clay Aiken performed to two sold-out houses at the Dorton Arena on the fairgrounds, thrilling fans that came from near and far to hear the Raleigh native and former American Idol runner-up.

"I just feel like a whole person when I hear him and see him," said Karen Holf, an older woman from New York who attended the evening concert.

Hundreds of die-hard fans attended a Monday morning breakfast and silent auction of Aiken-related items at the nearby RBC Center. Volunteers from Aiken's charity, the Bubel-Aiken Foundation, also were on hand to raise money.

Fans thronged the fairgrounds all day and rushed into Dorton Arena when the doors opened for the afternoon concert.

Aiken initially planned to perform one concert at the State Fair, but when tickets went on sale last month, they sold out within 10 minutes. Because of the intense interest and a computer glitch that oversold the 6,000-seat arena by 700 tickets, the singer agreed to add an afternoon concert. That one sold out within 14 minutes.

Aiken was paid $100,000 for each concert.

Some local residents complained that Internet ticket sales shut them out of the performance, but dedicated fans were glad they had a chance to see their idol up close.

"We just like Clay," said Kala Splett, who drove 1,300 miles from Minnesota with her friends Christina Stangle and Kim Wagger to attend the concert. "He's an amazing man. He's a great man of God, and we are just kind drawn here to see him."

The trio said they had to leave immediately after the evening concert for the 20-hour drive back to Minnesota.

"We have to be back in class by Wednesday," Wagger said.
NBC 17 RALEIGH
 
ALWAYS AND FOREVER-UNCONDITIONALLY!!!

ClayManiacs.com  |  Archive  |  Solo Tour 2004  |  SOLO TOUR MEDIA - PREVIEWS, REVIEWS & MORE
 

gfxgfx
gfx
Powered by SMF 2.0 RC3 | SMF © 2006–2010, Simple Machines LLC Page created in 0.111 seconds with 23 queries.
Helios Multi design by BlocWeb
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!